The Electronic Communication Privacy Center (EPIC) yesterday filed and extraordinary suit against the NSA for the scale and scope of it's domestic wiretapping program. The suit, filed as a Writ of Mandamus, seeks to overturn an order from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court instructing Verizon to hand over metadata on all of it's domestic customers. The order was first revealed in the Guardian newspaper last month by whistle-blower Edward Snowden.

A miracle of Western diplomatic cooperation was achieved today as the US State Department coordinated its allies Italy, France, Spain, and Portugal in a successful effort to deny Bolivian President Evo Morales a clear path and refueling rights on his way out of Europe. The presidential plane was forced to land in Austria, where it was held for 13 hours while Austrian police attempted to search the aircraft for fugitive American whistleblower Edward Snowden, who may be seeking political asylum without a valid passport.

Somewhere in northwest Pakistan Tuesday a sound was heard. Hellfire missiles streaked towards a residential compound. Eighteen people, possibly including civilians, were incinerated and another sound was heard in Washington: the sound of change dropping into Dianne Feinstein's purse.

Throughout the past weeks of revelations regarding the NSA and other agencies spying on millions of Americans, a bipartisan clique of hawks in both the Obama administration and Congress have repeatedly stated that the secret survellance practices are legal. The NSA director, General Keith Alexander, has already lied to Congress once that can be proven, without even a threat of sanction. The UK Guardian has released new documents today that show the legal justification for these survellance was so secret the former NSA director may have never actually read them.

Throughout the past weeks of revelations regarding the NSA and other agencies spying on millions of Americans, a bipartisan clique of hawks in both the Obama administration and Congress have repeatedly stated that the secret survellance practices are legal. The NSA director, General Keith Alexander, has already lied to Congress once that can be proven, without even a threat of sanction. The UK Guardian has released new documents today that show the legal justification for these survellance was so secret the former NSA director may have never actually read them.

In 2010, David Petraeus's four stars were ascendant. On his way to an eventual CIA directorship, he was head of CENTCOM, the premier combatant command within the armed services and arguably the current key stepping stone to the services on the Joint Chiefs of Staff or to Political Office. He was loved by the Bush administration as the architect of the surge in Iraq and entrenched enough to maneuver the Obama administration into a similar strategy in Afghanistan. He also may have been building a personal military empire that far exceeded the scope of his authority as CENTCOM commander.

Investigative Journalist Michael Hastings was killed Tuesday in a fiery crash close to his home in Los Angles. His car, which was reported to have been traveling at a high rate of speed, jumped the median and immediately exploded in a dramatic fashion upon impact with a tree.

The Free Press has covered the security holes in electronic voting for over a decade. In that time we have looked at both the hypothetical and real dangers of electronic voting. We've documented how the Bush administration stole the election in 2004 through internet based attacks.

The Guardian’s recent revelations concerning the intelligence community collecting cell phone call and location data from every single American, as well as the massive cataloging of social media interactions has jump-started a new national dialogue on privacy. This new social dialogue has not yet begun to include questions about the intelligence community speaking secretly rather than listening secretly.

Since the beginning of the current privacy scandal, Twitter has been careful to brand itself as a champion of privacy rights – but are they? As other tech titans first denied complicity, then joined together seeking permission to discuss it in the compliant American media, Twitter remained outside the fray.

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